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Men & Women and Tools Bridging the Divide
By Marcia Braundy

Although there have been many equity initiatives to encourage women to train and work in the trades, Canadian women still represent less than 3 percent of tradesworkers. Why does this disparity continue to exist? In Men & Women and Tools, Marcia Braundy — herself a tradesperson — explores this issue by focusing on male resistance to the inclusion of women in technical work. Early in her research, Braundy conducted an interview with several male and female tradespeople. Finding this interview rich with deeply ingrained notions of masculinity and female roles, Braundy constructs a short play from their words. Deconstructing the play line by line, this book weaves together scholarly research and lived experience to explore the historical and cultural origins of the ideas expressed. 

 

“We know that class is gendered, and that often upper class professionals and blue collar working men set the highest barriers to women’s entry. In her careful and erudite book, Marcia Braundy brings together the tools of the trade and the hands that hold them. By exploring men’s resistance to equality, this book explodes the myths on which that resistance is based.” 

 — Michael Kimmel, author of The Gendered Society, Stony Brook University

 

http://www.fernwoodpublishing.ca/Men-Women-and-Tools/

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The Nobel Peace Prize for 2011

The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2011 is to be divided in three equal parts between Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work. We cannot achieve democracy and lasting peace in the world unless women obtain the same opportunities as men to influence developments at all levels of society.

In October 2000, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1325. The resolution for the first time made violence against women in armed conflict an international security issue. It underlined the need for women to become participants on an equal footing with men in peace processes and in peace work in general.

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is Africa's first democratically elected female president. Since her inauguration in 2006, she has contributed to securing peace in Liberia, to promoting economic and social development, and to strengthening the position of women. Leymah Gbowee mobilized and organized women across ethnic and religious dividing lines to bring an end to the long war in Liberia, and to ensure women's participation in elections. She has since worked to enhance the influence of women in West Africa during and after war. In the most trying circumstances, both before and during the "Arab spring", Tawakkul Karman has played a leading part in the struggle for women's rights and for democracy and peace in Yemen.

It is the Norwegian Nobel Committee's hope that the prize to Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman will help to bring an end to the suppression of women that still occurs in many countries, and to realise the great potential for democracy and peace that women can represent.

Oslo, October 7, 2011

SOURCE:
MLA style: "The Nobel Peace Prize 2011 - Press Release". Nobelprize.org. 11 Oct 2011 http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/2011/press.html

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October is Women's History Month

2011 THEME - WOMEN IN CANADIAN MILITARY FORCES: A PROUD LEGACY

October is Women's History Month in Canada. Proclaimed in 1992 by the Government of Canada, Women's History Month provides an opportunity for Canadians to learn about the important contributions of women and girls to our society – and to the quality of our lives today.

Women's History Month 2011 recognizes women's invaluable contributions to the military in Canada over the years.

Whether as serving members of the armed forces or as civilians providing support roles, women have worked on every front -- on the battlefield, in the air and on the sea; as pilots and peacekeepers; nurses and physicians; war artists and war correspondents; in espionage and engineering.  Regardless of the challenges and the risks, women have stepped up to answer the call and Canada's military history is rich with their stories.

During Women's History Month, we honour Canadian women, past and present, who have done incredible work within and outside the Canadian Forces, taking on great challenges and opening doors so that others may follow. 

 

Erica Jamie (Samms) Hurley (Youth Award), Mount Moriah, Newfoundland
October is Women's History Month in Canada. Proclaimed in 1992 by the Government of Canada, Women's History Month provides an opportunity for Canadians to learn about the important contributions of women and girls to our society – and to the quality of our lives today.
Women's History Month 2011 recognizes women's invaluable contributions to the military in Canada over the years.

Whether as serving members of the armed forces or as civilians providing support roles, women have worked on every front -- on the battlefield, in the air and on the sea; as pilots and peacekeepers; nurses and physicians; war artists and war correspondents; in espionage and engineering.  Regardless of the challenges and the risks, women have stepped up to answer the call and Canada's military history is rich with their stories.

During Women's History Month, we honour Canadian women, past and present, who have done incredible work within and outside the Canadian Forces, taking on great challenges and opening doors so that others may follow. 

 

TOP 20 FACTS – WOMEN IN CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY

Click here to download the Top 20 Facts in PDF format (226 KB) *.


  1. In the 18th and 19th centuries, women were behind-the-scenes in French and English military actions in Canada. They provided key support, protecting property from marauders, and preparing ammunition, food and medicines during times of conflict.

  2. If not for Laura Secord, Canada might be part of the United States today. In 1813, Secord made a brave journey on foot during the War of 1812. She saved Canada by warning the British of an American attack.

  3. Nurses were the first women in the Canadian military. Twelve women served in the Northwest Rebellion in 1885 as nurses in military hospitals.

  4. News must get out, especially in times of conflict. In 1898, Canadian journalist Catherine Ferguson (known by her nom de plume Kit Coleman) became the world's first woman war correspondent, covering the Spanish-American War.

  5. Until well into the 20th century, women were mostly left out of military service. But they were ready to serve, organizing for the home defence of Canada from invasion during both World Wars. In 1941, women's branches of military services were created as auxiliaries to the air force and the army. Many new recruits came from among the approximately 5,000 skilled home-defence members across Canada.

  6. It took war to open doors for women in the military. In both World Wars, the growing wartime bureaucracy meant women became officially recognized members of the armed forces in areas beyond nursing. By the Second World War, the military had trained servicewomen in all three branches.

  7. During First World War, more than 2,800 women served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

  8. Death is a harsh reality of war and does not discriminate against gender. During First World War, 39 Canadian women military staff died in service.

  9. Wartime military nurses were the first Canadian women to vote in a federal election. In 1917, some 2,000 military nurses were given the vote – a right they exercised in the federal election held that year.

  10. Even in times of crisis, love is in the air! In January 1940, the first wartime marriage of the Second World War took place in England between a British woman and a Canadian serviceman. By the War's end, some 48,000 such marriages followed and Canada gained a generation of "war brides."

  11. There was a woman behind a big warplane, the Hawker Hurricane! In the Second World War, Canadian engineer Elizabeth “Elsie” Gregory MacGill (1905-1980) oversaw the production of Hawker Hurricane fighter planes, used in the Battle of Britain. As a result, Elsie earned the nickname "Queen of the Hurricanes."

  12. During the Second World War, 72 Aboriginal women from Canada served overseas.

  13. Women served with courage in both World Wars. But in 1946, after the Second World War ended, the women's sections of all three Canadian armed service branches were disbanded. Luckily, officials had second thoughts. In 1951, all three services of the Canadian military begin to recruit women into the reserves. By 1955, more than 5,000 women were serving in the Canadian military.

  14. In 1955, the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Navy began to recruit women for regular services, not only the reserves.

  15. In 1965, the Government of Canada decided to continue to employ women in the Canadian Armed Forces, but it established a ceiling of 1,500 women members across all three services.

  16. In 1979, the Canadian military colleges opened their doors to women and the first group of female students enrolled in the college the following year.

  17. Major Wendy Clay paved the way on August 19, 1974, when she qualified for her pilot's wings – alas, before the pilot trade was open to all women. On February 13th, 1981, Canadian Air Force Captains Nora Bottomley, Dee Brasseur and Leah Mosher followed Major Clay's lead, graduating as the first Canadian women military pilots.

  18. In 1981, Second-Lieutenant Inge Plug became the first woman helicopter pilot in the Canadian Forces and Lieutenant Karen McCrimmon became the Canadian Forces' first woman air navigator.

  19. In 1987, the Air Force announced that all areas of Air Force employment, including fighter pilot, were open to women.

  20. Today, women can enroll in all occupations of the Canadian Forces, including combat arms, and they can serve in any environment.

 

SOURCE:
http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/dates/whm-mhf/index-eng.html

 

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October 18, 1929 - Women become persons

The Story

On this day in 1929, women are finally declared "persons" under Canadian law. The historic legal victory is due to the persistence of five Alberta women — Emily Murphy, Nellie McClung, Irene Parlby, Louise McKinney and Henrietta Muir Edwards. The battle started in 1916. From Murphy's very first day as a judge, lawyers had challenged her rulings because she is not a "person" under Canadian law.

By 1927, the women have garnered support all across Canada. They petition the nation's Supreme Court. After five weeks of debate, the appeal is unanimously denied. Shocked, the women take the fight to the Privy Council of the British government; in those days Canada's highest court.

On Oct. 18, 1929, they win. In this CBC Radio clip from June 11, 1938, Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King unveils a plaque commemorating the women activists in what became known as the "Persons Case." Nellie McClung, one of the only two surviving of the "Famous Five," speaks of the historic struggle.

Did you know?

  • Lord Sankey, Lord Chancellor of England's Privy Council, announced the unanimous decision. It stated "the exclusion of women from all public offices is a relic of days more barbarous than ours. And to those who would ask why the word 'person' should include females, the obvious answer is, why should it not?"
  • Emily Murphy (1868-1933) led the legal challenge in 1927. Born in Cookstown, Ont., a mother of two, she was the first woman in the British Empire to be appointed a magistrate, in 1916.
  • Novelist, legislator, prohibitionist and suffragette Nellie McClung (1873-1951) was the first woman on the CBC Board of Governors, a representative to the League of Nations, a Sunday school teacher and mother of five.
  • Louise McKinney (1868-1931) was the first woman sworn into the Alberta Legislature, and in the British Empire. As an MLA in 1917, she helped initiate social assistance for widows and immigrants, and, with Murphy, helped establish the Dower Act, giving women property rights in marriage.
  • Irene Parlby (1868-1965), elected to the Alberta Legislature in 1921, helped push through 18 bills to improve the plight of women and children. She was the second woman cabinet minister in the British Empire.
  • Henrietta Edwards (1849-1931) was active in prison reform and organized the forerunner to the YWCA to provide job training for poor working women. An author and law student, she helped establish the National Council of Women in 1890.
  • In 1939, portraits of each of the Famous Five were unveiled in the Alberta Legislature.
  • In 1979, a medallion commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Persons Case, designed by Dora de Pedery-Hunt, was released.
  • In 1999, a monument at Calgary's Olympic Plaza was unveiled. That same year, the Governor General's annual commemorative awards were established, to recognize those who have made outstanding contributions to women's quality of life in Canada.
  • The "Famous Five" bronze monument on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, unveiled Oct. 18, 2000, commemorates the women activists. Until then there had only been two statues on Parliament Hill dedicated to women, both Queens of England.
  • In 2003, the Famous 5 will be featured on Canada's $50 bill. Former Senator and human rights activist Thérèse Casgrain will also be featured on the back.

 

Credits Women become persons Medium: Radio Stock-shot Program: CBC Radio News Special Broadcast Date: June 11, 1938 Guest(s): William Lyon Mackenzie King, Nellie McClung Duration: 4:12 Photo: National Archives PA-195432 Last updated: Jan. 6, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

 

http://archives.cbc.ca/on_this_day/10/18/

 

Governor General's Awards in Commemoration of the Persons Case
Introductory Note

Like so much of the history of women in Canada, the Persons Case was forgotten for 50 years. In 1979, on the 50th anniversary of the Privy Council's historic decision, the Government of Canada instituted the Governor General's Awards in Commemoration of the Persons Case to recognize outstanding contributions to advance equality for women in Canada. The Awards are presented annually at a ceremony in October.

Recipients of these Awards continue the tradition of courage, integrity and hard work which the Famous Five of the Persons Case inspired. Their effectiveness and courage has advanced the cause of equality for girls and women in significant and substantial ways that have enriched their communities.

Five awards are given annually to candidates chosen from across Canada, in addition to one Youth award.

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Human Resources, Labour and Employment Education
March 31, 2011

http://www.releases.gov.nl.ca/releases/2011/hrle/0401n04.htm

Applications can be found at:
http://www.hrle.gov.nl.ca/hrle/lmda/apprenticeship.html
For more information please contact Cyril Miller,  LMDA CSO at 729-7229  

New Wage Subsidy Program to Benefit Aspiring Apprentices

Building a qualified and skilled workforce to address the future demands of the province’s labour market was the focus of an announcement made today at College of the North Atlantic’s Prince Philip Drive Campus during the Skills Canada - Annual Skilled Career Day.

The Honourable Darin King, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, made the $2.6 million announcement to implement the Apprenticeship Wage Subsidy Program, which is funded in part under the Labour Market Development Agreement and the Labour Market Agreement. The program is a joint initiative of the Department of Human Resources, Labour and Employment and the Department of Education.

“The Apprenticeship Wage Subsidy Program will provide apprentices with the opportunity to gain work experience to successfully progress through their training to become journeyperson certified,” said Minister King. “Our government recognizes the increased demand for skilled tradespeople that is developing throughout our province. As the provincial economy grows and labour market demands increase, we will depend heavily on the individuals who are progressing through the apprenticeship program to ensure our province’s success.”

Under the program, the financial incentive to employers will help offset salary costs of hiring apprentices. A contribution rate for wage subsidies will be applied to participating apprentices based on their years of experience, as follows: 90 per cent for first year apprentices; 80 per cent for the second year; and 60 per cent for the third and fourth-year apprentices.

“This program will help address the difficulties apprentices have had in gaining employment experience, especially those in their first and second year blocks of training,” said the Honourable Joan Burke, Minister of Education. “It also builds on the achievements of the Skills Task Force, and the momentum evident at our very successful recent stakeholder forum. We have heard the voices of business and industry. We have heard the voices of apprentices. Now, through the Apprentice Wage Subsidy Program, we are supporting and encouraging increased employer involvement in the apprenticeship program, particularly among those who have not traditionally participated, such as small and medium-sized businesses.”

Priority groups eligible for the funding will include first and second year apprentices, particularly under-represented groups such as women, Aboriginals, persons with disabilities, and youth.

“Through this new program, the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, as a whole, will benefit from having a larger pool of skilled and certified workers to address growing labour demands,” said Minister King. “In light of impending major construction projects on the horizon, our government feels this investment is timely and will be extremely effective in supporting apprentices and their potential employers throughout the province.”

To find out more about this and other labour market initiatives of the Provincial Government, visit www.lmiworks.nl.ca or call the Labour Market and Career Information Hotline at
1-800-563-6600.

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TRADES WORK FOR ME!

The Partnership for a Dynamic Work Force collaborates with necessary stakeholders to remove barriers that can often times prevent women from entering the trades.

Through financial support, the Partnership provides training for apprenticeable and non-apprenticeable trades that lead to the right skills to obtain jobs in the construction sector.

To support and maintain an inclusive work environment that values diversity, respects differences and is safe for all workers. The Partnership takes advantage of access to funding, where available and appropriate, from various levels of government and other stakeholders to support diversity initiatives in Newfoundland and Labrador.

CONTACT INFORMATION

1-877-495-8585

Office to Advance Women Apprentices
89 McNamara Drive,
Paradise, NL
A1L 3W2

Tel: (709) 757-5434
Fax: (709) 757-5437
Web: www.womenapprentices.ca

 

 

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